Arts Advocacy Program

Mayor Vetoes Bill Clarifying Washington DC Arts Commission’s Independence

By |2019-10-25T10:51:31-04:00October 11th, 2019|News, Updates|

UPDATE: 10/24/19: On October 22, the DC Council voted unanimously to override Mayor Muriel Bowser's veto of an emergency bill that would have clarified the DCCAH’s independence. “The underlying legislation cemented DCCAH's separation from the executive's office after a tumultuous summer during which the mayor tried and failed to grab control of the District's public arts.” (see original post below) [...]

Art Auction 2019

By |2019-10-17T11:06:13-04:00October 8th, 2019|Events|

The National Coalition Against Censorship is grateful to the incredible artists who have generously donated to this year's NCAC Art Auction. The works will be displayed on Monday, November 11th at Let Me Speak: A Celebration of Free Speech and Its Defenders, NCAC's annual benefit in New York City. The auction is hosted online by Paddle8. Click here to [...]

San Francisco Mural Controversy: Perspectives and Updates

By |2019-10-04T13:45:00-04:00August 26th, 2019|News|

UPDATE October 4, 2019: The George Washington High School Alumni Association filed a lawsuit in the public interest against the San Francisco Unified School District Board of Education, challenging the School Board’s commitment to remove from public view Victor Arnautoff’s 1936 New Deal mural with panels without conducting an environmental review, which is required by California law.  UPDATE August 13, [...]

NCAC Urges Queens Library to Restore Canceled Photography Exhibition

By |2019-02-26T15:18:06-05:00December 20th, 2018|Letters, News|

Image courtesy of Drew Kerr The National Coalition Against Censorship (NCAC) urges Queens Library to restore an exhibition of photographs it canceled and allow it to run for three weeks as originally planned. Drew Kerr’s exhibition, Faces of The 7 Train, consists of 32 black-and-white photographs that the artist shot of passengers on the 7 train over the course of [...]

Tumblr Adult Content Ban Will Chill Free Expression Online

By |2019-05-01T11:37:37-04:00December 19th, 2018|Blog, News|

On December 17th, Tumblr permanently banned adult content from its platform. Under the new community guidelines, any image that depicts sex acts, real-life human genitalia, or (with a few exceptions) female nipples will be hidden from public view. Despite the company’s claims, the new guidelines will not create a “better, more positive” Tumblr.

Smart Tactics: Curating Difficult Content

By |2018-10-29T18:08:38-04:00October 29th, 2018|Resources|

SMART TACTICS: Curating Difficult Content examines the internal and external pressures curators must navigate when considering potentially controversial material. Combining decades of advocacy experience with extensive interviews and curatorial surveys, this volume includes both a report on what happens behind the scenes in art institutions and a handbook for confronting the challenges of curating difficult content. 

University of Kentucky Unveils Installation to Encourage Dialogue about Race

By |2019-07-02T15:40:51-04:00August 28th, 2018|Blog|

The University of Kentucky has unveiled a new site-specific public artwork by Philadelphia artist Karyn Olivier, commissioned in response to a heated controversy around a fresco that students said was traumatizing, creating a model for balancing conflict and tensions around campus art.

NCAC Joins FIRE and the ACLU Urging the University of Kansas to Restore American Flag Artwork

By |2018-07-18T12:24:48-04:00July 16th, 2018|Blog|

NCAC has joined the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Kansas in a letter to the University of Kansas (KU) strongly urging it to take a stand against censorship by restoring a public artwork that the university removed last week.

Kansas Governor and Secretary of State Pressure University to Remove Artwork | UPDATE: NCAC Co-Signs Joint Letter

By |2018-07-16T17:26:01-04:00July 12th, 2018|Blog, News, Press Releases|

Kansas Governor Jeff Colyer and Secretary of State Kris Kobach separately pressured officials at the University of Kansas (KU) to remove an art display, threatening the free expression of the artist, curator and KU students.