How Obscene Is This?: The Decency Clause Turns 20

NCAC Presents a Series of Programs on the Effects of the Culture Wars on the Arts featuring Artists, Filmmakers, Funders, and Former NEA Chair Bill Ivey

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 9, 2010
 
MEDIA CONTACTS
Marshall Reese, National Coalition Against Censorship (212) 807-6222 or marshall@ncac.org
Annie Shaw, Vera List Center for Art and Politics at The New School, (212) 229-2436 x 2750 vlc@newschool.edu
Michael Grant, School of Visual Arts, (212) 592-2011or mgrant@sva.edu
 

 NEW YORK – On the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the Congressional decision to require the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) to consider "general standards of decency and respect" in awarding grants, the National Coalition Against Censorship (NCAC) presents How Obscene is This?, a program about censorship and arts funding.
 
The program includes panel discussions, organized in collaboration with The Vera List Center for Art and Politics at The New School (VLC), and film screenings co-sponsored by the BFA Visual and Critical Studies Department at the School of Visual Arts (SVA). The programs have been generously supported by the CrossCurrents Foundation.





 
Among the questions the series will explore are: what do "standards of decency and respect" mean in today’s increasingly diverse society? What effect does the constriction of NEA funding and the timidity of publicly funded art institutions have on art production in the U.S.? What alternatives has shrinking funding generated? What is it that provokes controversy today?
 
Two panels of prominent artists, non-profit arts organization directors, art dealers, and founders of alternative spaces will examine these questions. Laura Flanders of GritTV moderates both panels.
 
 
Wednesday, September 15th – 6:30 to 8:30 pm
Panel 1: Survival vs. Autonomy: Public Funding of the Arts, Free Speech and Self-Censorship
The New School’s Tishman Auditorium, 66 West 12th Street, New York
FREE ADMISSION




















Participants include: Bill Ivey, Director of the Curb Center for Art, Enterprise, and Public Policy and former chair of the NEA (1998-2001); Beka Economopoulos, activist and founder of Not an Alternative and The Change You Want to See Gallery, an alternative space in Brooklyn; Nato Thompson, Chief Curator at Creative Time, author of Seeing Power: Socially Engaged Art in the Age of Cultural Production; and Martha Wilson, performance artist and founding director of Franklin Furnace Archive.


Wednesday, September 22, 2010 – 6:30 to 8:30 pm
Panel 2: Decency, Respect and Community Standards: What Offends Us Now?
The New School’s Tishman Auditorium, 66 West 12th
Street, New York
FREE ADMISSION











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