News

MK Asante, Leora Kahn & NYFA Chairs Named Film Contest Judges

By |2019-02-25T15:28:36-04:00April 12th, 2018|Press Releases|

The National Coalition Against Censorship continues its support of student-led protests by extending the deadline for its protest-themed film contest to May 15th. This year’s contest invites aspiring teen filmmakers to create short films on the value of protest as an instrument of social change. In the weeks leading up to the March for Our Lives and National School Walkouts [...]

NCAC Joins 32 Organizations in Amicus Brief to Strike Down the Trump Administration’s Travel Ban

By |2019-06-12T17:57:43-04:00April 10th, 2018|Blog, Press Releases|

(Photo: Masha George/Flickr/cc) NCAC joins PEN America and 31 other prominent arts organizations to jointly file a friend of the court brief in the case of State of Hawaii v. Trump, urging the Supreme Court to strike down the third version of the Trump travel ban issued on September 27, 2017. Executive Order (EO) 13780 bans all immigration from six majority Muslim [...]

Meet Maggie Budzyna: A Young Filmmaker Determined to Resist Injustice

By |2018-06-28T11:49:55-04:00April 9th, 2018|Blog|

Maggie Budzyna's debut film, CENSORED, tackles the slippery slope of banning words from public dialogue. We spoke with the 17-year-old filmmaker about censorship, youth activism and the importance of using her artistic freedom to resist injustice. Watch her film and read the interview.

Departure of MassArt Professor Saul Levine Raises Academic Freedom Concerns

By |2018-04-03T11:54:45-04:00April 3rd, 2018|Press Releases|

After anonymous complaints about brief images of sexual acts in an avant-garde film shown in class, the Massachusetts College of Art and Design launched a sexual harassment investigation. Saul Levine, the professor teaching the class and the target of the investigation, who is also a well-regarded avant-garde filmmaker, resigned in protest. This incident raises serious concerns beyond the individual case.

Robert S. Rubin, Who Defended The Brooklyn Museum Against Rudy Giuliani, Passes Away at 86

By |2019-03-06T15:40:55-04:00March 26th, 2018|Blog|

Remembering Robert S. Rubin and his defense of The Brooklyn Museum in a highly publicized controversy in which he went head-to-head with then-mayor Rudy Giuliani who threatened the museum's funding if a piece was not removed from a 1999 exhibition.

Government Transparency Is Not a Partisan Issue: Eclipse of Sunshine Week

By |2018-03-16T16:33:03-04:00March 16th, 2018|Blog|

Since 2005 the National Association of News Editors has branded the third week of March “Sunshine Week.” But in 2018, Sunshine Week is looking less bright. Sunshine Week has been obscured by an eclipse. Zach Garrett cautions against allowing partisan politics to obscure the real issues.

NCAC Opposes Michigan City’s Decision to Demolish Public Artwork

By |2018-04-04T10:12:39-04:00March 15th, 2018|Press Releases|

Early last Tuesday morning (March 6), the Kalamazoo City Commission voted 5-1 to remove Fountain of the Pioneers. The decision follows a flurry of recent protests by local activist groups, indigenous people, residents and historians. NCAC is concerned by the swiftness of this decision and cautions that such determinations should not be made in hasty emotional response to complaints.

Eclipse of Sunshine Week: NCAC Joins Coalition Condemning Government Threats to Openness, Ethics and Accountability

By |2019-06-12T17:57:59-04:00March 13th, 2018|Blog|

NCAC has joined a large group of organizations in opposing the continued, and growing, threats to openness, ethics and accountability created by a culture of secrecy in the US government. NCAC and its cosignatories have designated this week, which should celebrate public access to information, the Eclipse of Sunshine Week.

Savannah Spirit: I Am a Camera

By |2019-03-22T17:07:06-04:00March 8th, 2018|Blog|

For the latest edition of our Arts Advocacy Podcast, we talked to the bi-coastal artist and photographer Savannah Spirit. Her sun-drenched nude self portraits are repeatedly flagged and removed as ‘obscene’ or ‘inappropriate’ by Instagram and Facebook. This interview discusses her frustration with social media and its necessity to artists working today.

Artspace Censors Nudes in Exhibition About Body Positivity

By |2019-03-07T22:30:37-04:00February 22nd, 2018|Blog|

Artspace, the self-described "non-profit real estate developer for the arts," creates affordable live-work spaces in a world where such spaces are rapidly disappearing. However, on more than one occasion, Artspace has censored works exhibited by residents on their premises. The most recent incident occurred in East Minneapolis.

NCAC Opposes Removal of To Kill A Mockingbird and Huckleberry Finn from Minnesota Classrooms

By |2018-02-20T16:21:28-04:00February 7th, 2018|Press Releases|

While it is understandable that a novel that repeatedly uses a highly offensive racial slur would generate discomfort among some parents and students, the problems of living in a society where racial tensions persist will not be resolved by banishing literary classics from the classroom.

Between Boycotts and Special Interest Campaigns: the Chilling of Speech on Israel and Palestine

By |2019-03-20T14:19:20-04:00February 5th, 2018|Blog|

Any art institution that displays art about the Israeli/Palestinian conflict - or even art that is created by Israeli or Palestinian artists - needs to carefully navigate a space between intense pressures coming from right-wing pro-Israel groups and calls for boycott from supporters of the cultural BDS movement.

Anti-BDS Laws Move to Federal Courts | UPDATE: Victory for ACLU!

By |2018-01-31T18:39:52-04:00January 31st, 2018|Blog|

Following a widespread tide of denouncements of anti-BDS legislation, objections to the state laws have now moved into the purview of federal courts. The ACLU recently filed separate First Amendment challenges against bills in Kansas and Arizona, alleging that they prohibit political expression and association and engage in speaker-based discrimination.