Acclaimed Challenged Author Jason Reynolds Will Headline 2021 Banned Books Week

By |2021-04-12T16:53:44-04:00April 13th, 2021|Banned Books Week, News|

Jason Reynolds to headline Banned Books Week 2021, which has the theme, “Books Unite Us. Censorship Divides Us.” Two of Reynolds' books for young people made the Top 10 banned and challenged books of 2020 for their handling of issues around racism and racial justice.

When Can Speech Be Punished? A Primer on Unprotected Incitement to Violence

By |2021-01-14T15:38:03-05:00January 14th, 2021|News|

A breakdown of protected versus unprotected speech in the wake of the riot on Capitol Hill. Can free expression advocates support punishment for incitement to violence while still supporting the legal protections for “hate speech” or other offensive speech? And why do we protect offensive speech in the first place?

Let Me Speak Design Contest Series

By |2020-12-19T16:54:22-05:00September 25th, 2020|News|

As part of NCAC’s virtual Celebration of Free Speech and Its Defenders Benefit, we are happy to announce the Let Me Speak Design Contest Series, a collection of three unique art contests:  Becky Albertalli Fan Art  Portugal The Man Boycott the Book Ban Logo  NCAC Youth Free Expression Film Contest Logo  Each contest is an opportunity for artists and designers [...]

NCAC Urges Congress Not to Authorize FISA Anti-Privacy Provisions

By |2020-12-19T16:54:23-05:00September 15th, 2020|News|

NCAC has joined a coalition of two dozen organizations calling on Congressional leaders not to reauthorize several expired provisions of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) authorities by adding them as amendments to a must-pass appropriations bill or other emergency legislation. In a letter sent to Congress on September 14, NCAC and the other organizations argue that these controversial measures [...]

NCAC Opposes Ban of Cartoon Protesting Violence Against Black People

By |2020-12-19T16:54:23-05:00August 27th, 2020|News|

NCAC, joined by ten organizations, is protesting a Texas school district’s decision to remove from a school website an editorial cartoon that was part of a class assignment because it criticizes the use of violence against Black people over the course of American history, including violence by police. The assignment was canceled after the National Fraternal Order of Police complained [...]

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